My She’s Geeky Tweets: Series Index

Last weekend, I attended She’s Geeky at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA. This unconference, organized by Kaliya Hamlin, is “for all women who are interested in technology” — although it touched on several other types of geekiness as well.

I live-tweeted the sessions I attended, and here is the index to my tweetstreams from each session. I’ll be posting them over the next few days. The ones with live “my tweeks” links are ready to read. The rest, I’m still producing — although in the meantime I’m linking to existing notes posted to She’s Geeky site (where available).

This order does not reflect the order in which the sessions I attended occurred. I’m just posting in an order that makes sense to me. Enjoy.

…Of course, I couldn’t attend every session — but lots of other attendees took notes too, and plenty of folks tweeted this event using the hashtag ShesGeeky.

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Dangerous concentration of geeks in Boulder

Yesterday, there was a minor afterparty to Denver’s Thin Air Summit. At Boulder’s lovely Dushanbe Teahouse, we had a tweetup of over 30 local coding and media geeks. TAS keynoter Jeremiah Owyang of Forrester Research shot this video so we could put faces to names — that is, the really important kind of name for this conference: Twitter handles.

If you didn’t catch all those Twitter handles (they’re not all easy to spell), then check out the comments to Jeremiah’s post.

Working with Journalists: What’s in It for Geeks?

NOTE: This post originally appeared on Poynter’s E-Media Tidbits, and there are some comments over there. I’m reposting this here because, frankly, this site poses fewer hurdles to commenters, and I’d like to get some diverse discussion happening.

Earlier this week I wrote about the internal and external obstacles journalism schools face when trying to achieve collaboration with other academic departments (such as computer science). That spurred a pretty interesting discussion in the comments.

This discussion got me thinking: Right now, it’s becoming obvious to many journalists that our field sorely needs lots of top-notch, creative technologists. Developers for whom software is a medium, and an art form. Developers with a deep passion for information, credibility, fairness, usefulness, and free speech.

However, my impression is that, so far, it’s not nearly so obvious to most “geeks” (and I use that term with the utmost affection and respect, as do many geeks themselves) how they might benefit from collaborating with journalists, j-schools, and news organizations.

So if journalists need geeks, but right now they don’t need (or even necessarily want) us as much, the question becomes: What’s in this for the geeks? Why might they want to work with us? Where’s their incentive?… Continue reading