Gangnam/Klingon Style + Kim Jong Un?

Since I don’t have cable TV, I’m forever behind on pop culture. This weekend my sister Lynn tweeted me:

Hey, @agahran ! The perfect blend of Korean pop and Star Trek! http://t.co/bi4uM4EL

That link took me to a HuffPo story about a Star Trek-themed parody of a smash Korean Pop (K-pop) dance rap hit, “Gangnam Style.” I’d never heard of or seen the original by K-Pop rapper PSY, so I decided to check it out — because you can’t appreciate a parody until you see the original. Here it is:

And here it is again, in Klingon!

It struck me when I watched the original: Doesn’t PSY bear a suspicious resemblance to the new North Korean leader Kim Jong Un? Hmmmm…

…See what I mean? I sense a coup coming across the DMZ. Perhaps they’re attempting to emulate this Coup, from Oakland?

My pop-culture education for the day is now complete. I can return to unraveling the mysteries of the Box Model now….

Not tall enough to ride this attraction

Making some lemonade here. Had a rather unpleasant interpersonal experience lately, and decided I needed to set some clear entry requirements (emotional maturity and communication skills) for people I let very far into my life. So instead of just chalking it up to “Been there, done that, got the t-shirt,” I actually GOT THE T-SHIRT! A friend is working on a better line art version which I’ll be selling online. But for now, here’s the concept. Whadya think?

You must be at least this tall to ride this attraction. Custom ordered from Zazzle.com. Better line art version to follow.

FDA approves prescription Placebo (Onion Radio News)

A recurring theme in my thoughts and work lately is psychological resistance to demonstrable facts. (See: Why facts will never be enough to make people believe). Sometimes that’s due to cognitive dissonance, emotional reasoning, or herd reinforcement. But sometimes it’s due to a plain lack of understanding of what science is and how it functions.

So this recent episode from The Onion Radio News reduced me to helpless giggles. Enjoy!

UPDATE: On a related note, science journalist Christie Aschwanden alerted me to this 2008 NYT story: Experts Question Placebo Pill for Children. Thanks! Brilliant! You just can’t make this shit up!

My first TV news appearance: CNN interview, Easter 2011

This past Sunday (Easter 2011) was a pretty interesting day for me. I did my first-ever TV news appearance — I was interviewed live on CNN by Fredricka Whitfield about how mobile phone users are more vulnerable to e-mail phishing attempts. Here’s the video (sorry about the annoying preroll ads)…


CNN tech Writer Amy Gahran talks to CNN about… by BeyondPixBroadcast

And here’s the transcript.

Now that you’ve seen the finished product, here’s the backstory….

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Facebook Will Eat Your Children

Tom Vilot just sent me this. Probably not far off the mark, given the sleazy way Facebook is messing with privacy settings.

URGENT FACEBOOK UPDATE: As of today, Facebook staff will be allowed to eat your children and pets. To turn this option off, go to settings, then privacy, then meals. Click the top two boxes to prevent the employees of Facebook from eating your beloved children and pets. (Unless you don’t like your children, in which case… Carry on!). Copy this to your status to warn your friends!!!

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Poll: What’s your favorite journalistic style guide, really?

C’mon, journo types, be honest. Which of these resources is REALLY your go-to, most relevant and current style guide?


Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: Reader Discussion Guide Excerpts

I just finished reading a killer classic fiction mashup (literally), Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. It’s a parody of the Jane Austen novel (which I tried to read in college and found unbearably tedious).

I must admit, though: The addition of a Night of the Living Dead-style zombie plague made all the endless fretting and plotting over how to present  oneself as appropriately marriageable in polite society surprisingly entertaining and understandable.

Because the thing is: The strictures of British aristocratic society — particularly how women were held in chattel status, and the ceaseless power plays of verbal indirection — were indeed nightmarish, soul-destroying, and cannibalistic.

Therefore, I don’t think it’s a stretch to consider this book a seminal feminist treatise. (God knows we need more entertaining seminal works of feminism!)

If you read this book (and I recommend it) don’t miss the reader’s discussion guide at the end. It contains 10 questions. Here are a couple of my favorites…

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