links for 2009-10-31

  • "Twitter Lists are a competitive social game, with users competing for attention. The question is whether they will remain and grow in value, or fade like blogrolls did.

    "Twitter lists have a major potential advantage over blogrolls. If users use them actively to manage their own attention, then they will be motivated to keep the lists current, since non-interesting people will clutter the followers own stream. It will be interesting to see how lists will continue serve those dual roles: managing attention and curating lists for public audiences. Will the criteria for display be the same as the criteria for personal use? Will the very early adopters, who are using lists for display, keep them up?"

  • "Over the last several months we have manually mapped more than 5,000 person name subject headings onto Freebase and DBPedia. And today we are pleased to announce the launch of http://data.nytimes.com and the release of these 5,000 person name subject headings as Linked Open Data.

    "So now you can visit http://data.nytimes.com/N66220017142656459133 and see that our “Colbert, Stephen” is equivalent to DBPedia’s http://dbpedia.org/resource/Stephen_Colbert and Freebase’s http://rdf.freebase.com/rdf/en.stephen_colbert. Even more importantly, your computer can visit http://data.nytimes.com/N66220017142656459133.rdf and get all of this information in a computer-readable Resource Description Framework (RDF) document"

  • Wow: If this report is correct, it's pretty infuriating:

    "pparently a long-term M/F/M/F poly quad with several children was doing what I've believed for a long time could be an entirely sensible solution to the burden of extended isolation and loneliness partners of deployed servicemen and servicewomen regularly have to endure. Both men were in the Army stationed at Ft. Campbell, KY, which straddles the Tennessee/Kentucky state line.

    "Tragically, one of the men has been killed in combat. As if this grieving family hadn't already been through enough, in the process of assigning survivor benefits the Army learned about the quad arrangement, decided to deny benefits to the widow and insisted on paternity testing to find out which man fathered the children – AND, the surviving husband in the quad faced a dishonorable discharge and loss of his career."

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