Following Mumbai Attacks via Social Media

Right now, the Indian city of Mumbai is reeling under coordinated terrorist attacks. In addition to mainstream news coverage from India and around the world, Internet users are sharing news and information — including people in Mumbai, some of whom are at or near the attack scenes.

Here’s a quick roundup of social media to check for updates and reactions. Some of this information is produced by professional news orgs and journalists, most is not. Use your own judgment regarding which to trust…

Twitter (UPDATED): It appears that on the ground in Mumbai, not many people are using Twitter to post firsthand reports. However, I am finding Twitter useful for links to blog posts, mainstream news reports, and photos and videos — which people from all over the world are monitoring and sharing.

Social news sites and citizen journalism (UPDATED):

Blogs: (Updated. New items added to top)

Organization sites:

  • My E-Media Tidbits colleague Alan Abbey noted that the Jewish organization Chabad has been reporting on its own site about one of the hostage situations — at the Chabad House in Mumbai. Initial report and followup.

Maps: Here’s an embeddable Google Map of the attack sites

Flickr: Vinu has several photos from an attack scene.

In addition, here are some especially interesting efforts by pro journalists and news orgs:

The South Asian Journalists Association is hosting live discussions with journalists and experts in Mumbai and the U.S. about the terrorist attacks on hotels and elsewhere in Mumbai.

NDTV is streaming live Indian TV coverage.

31 thoughts on Following Mumbai Attacks via Social Media

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  7. Thanks for your own comprehensive post! For the record, my name is Maitri Venkat-Ramani, not Maitri Vatul. Thanks, keep up the great work! Still following Twitter, but exasperated that some feel it necessary to divulge room numbers and sniper locations AND that terrorists have access to this electronic information. They’re too sophisticated and well-funded to be some two-bit outfit that formed yesterday.

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  13. Yeah, twitter and social media stuff is great but ultimately apart from the occasional flickr post thingie there is a lot of noise and nonsense. Ultimately, when push comes to shove, we turn to mainstream media. In India, TOI, NDTV and IBN are coming up with the best updates, many of which are regurgigated on twitter etc.

  14. Hi Amy
    Thanks for the link to NowPublic! It’s really interesting to see how Twitter is again being used in a breaking news event.
    By the way – in case you haven’t seen it – NowPublic has developed a tool called Scan which gathers content from the microblogosphere on specific stories.
    With our Mumbai attacks Scan we’re tracking Twitter and a variety of other microblogs for key search terms relating to the attacks, with some interesting results. http://my.nowpublic.com/tag/Mumbai/scan

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